Talking with Your Teen About Porn: Is Today’s Porn Harmless? Part 1 of 4

Talking with Your Teen About Porn: Is Today’s Porn Harmless? Part 1 of 4

Do I really need to talk to my son? It seems like viewing porn is pretty harmless and just a normal part of being male these days. Isn’t this just a phase most boys (or young people) go through?

Yes, the male brain is wired for visual stimulation. So, yes, it is normal for boys (and men) to be aroused by and interested in the sexual imagery available through pornography. Dr. William Struthers’ book “Wired for Intimacy: How Pornography Hijacks the Male Brain” offers a fantastic explanation of how the male brain is designed to be captivated by the sight of the female’s body, without the typical “boys will be boys” (wink-wink, nudge-nudge) excuse-making our society condones. 

Although it is normal to be curious and interested, the average young male today will not “casually” view pornography without being seriously impacted by what he consumes.

There are several reasons for this and therefore several reasons parents need to be talking with their kids about pornography. In today’s blog, we will explore the first of four:

  1. The adolescent brain is in a critical stage of development. Extensive literature points to the negative impact pornography has on young people, developmentally.

The brain stores our first sexual experiences with a chemical stamp that makes them incredibly powerful. For example, most people can easily recall (in vivid detail) their “first love,” their first encounter with pornography, or their first sexual experience. This serves us well, where our first experiences are healthy, and where our first sexual relationship is with our spouse – bonding us to that person with a powerful chemical attachment. It can create real difficulty where our first experiences are unhealthy or harmful.

The arousal template (what a person finds arousing) is significantly impacted by and strengthened by early sexual experiences.

So, whatever a young person is experiencing sexually (whether it is healthy or unhealthy) – is then paired with sexual arousal. The result is often that the brain easily grows attached to that stimulus. So, whatever your teen is experiencing and aroused by is also shaping what he (or she) will tend to desire. Repetition reinforces these patterns of arousal.

Be sure to look for the next blog in this series!

Mindy Pierce, LPC
MPierce @ growcounseling.com

Photo Cred: Jean-Paul Boudreau

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